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I want YOUR script!

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#82
Just wrote another short. Wasn't too concerned with it, though. Right now I'm just kind of writing things in effort to figure out how to shoot with a DSLR.
 
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#83
Happy Halloween, everyone. Wrote this the other night. It's super rough and I'm essentially using the same setup/structure as another script that I've posted, but oh well. Any/all feedback is welcome.

Enjoy your night, everyone.
Umm logline before I open it?
 
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#85
I have a some scripts to put on here, just tell me which one sounds interesting.

Elevated: An FBI agent is transporting the world's most dangerous prisoner to a specialized base in Alaska in a retrofitted Boeing 737. The twist: she's telepathic...even worse, his ex fiance. A psychological thriller.

Up Here: An astronaut is to wonder if he's the last of humanity after failing to stop nuclear war on Earth. His only companion is an AI who may or may not be trying to shoot him out of the airlock of his space station...
...and why is a 40 year old Challenger Shuttle outside the window?
 
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#86
I have a some scripts to put on here, just tell me which one sounds interesting.

Elevated: An FBI agent is transporting the world's most dangerous prisoner to a specialized base in Alaska in a retrofitted Boeing 737. The twist: she's telepathic...even worse, his ex fiance. A psychological thriller.

Up Here: An astronaut is to wonder if he's the last of humanity after failing to stop nuclear war on Earth. His only companion is an AI who may or may not be trying to shoot him out of the airlock of his space station...
...and why is a 40 year old Challenger Shuttle outside the window?
They both sound pretty tight palesAP.
 
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#87
I have a some scripts to put on here, just tell me which one sounds interesting.

Elevated: An FBI agent is transporting the world's most dangerous prisoner to a specialized base in Alaska in a retrofitted Boeing 737. The twist: she's telepathic...even worse, his ex fiance. A psychological thriller.

Up Here: An astronaut is to wonder if he's the last of humanity after failing to stop nuclear war on Earth. His only companion is an AI who may or may not be trying to shoot him out of the airlock of his space station...
...and why is a 40 year old Challenger Shuttle outside the window?

SEND BOTH! Those sound awesome!
 
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#90
Reluctance to post is valid. I used to attend a scriptwriters meetup and once had the first 30 pages of a work in progress read for feedback. In two weeks there was an attendee rewriting my script for his own purposes, new protagonist but nearly the same story. First and only time that happened but it made me me hold back and not submit a script for a table read when he was there. Fortunately in this case, he is a writer that never finishes a work. I no longer attend that group.
 
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#91
Here is my revised fourth draft of Little Dragon: The Life of Bruce Lee, it was a rewrite of the original 1975 screenplay "Bruce Lee: His Life and Legend" by Robert Clouse.
 
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#92
I'm pro, in that I've had several scripts produced over the past few years, get paid, etc. Not wishing to link my name to script trading for obvious reasons. No multi-million dollar projects as of yet, but I've been commissioned by both US and UK (and I currently live in neither). I've written exclusively in the horror genre.
Probably already been asked, somewhere else in the site that I can't find. How would you go about getting an agent or manager?
 
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#94
I noticed that there's a lot of writers on here. Not just collectors of Screenplays but people who write themselves. So why not make a thread where you can share your best script?

That's what I want here, your best script. The one that's your pride and joy, I want to read it.

I figure this is a nice way of getting to know other members on the site.

Feel free to tell me to shut up...
I'm not sure what the link was, or if it's still around, but Max made a second site for this a while back. I didn't go to it because it didn't allow you to use the old blue color, like this site does, and I just can't look at that black. Hahaha.
 
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#96
I lied. I did another pass. This is definitely it, though. All my attention is now on my second script.
What's going to be the most helpful form of feedback? Perhaps another way to frame this question - and it would then extend beyond xxoxia - is what have you found is the most valuable way of giving notes? I'm not in the industry at all (hence why I'm almost never able to share anything :/) so curious about what you've found are helpful ways of framing feedback.
 
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#97
What's going to be the most helpful form of feedback? Perhaps another way to frame this question - and it would then extend beyond xxoxia - is what have you found is the most valuable way of giving notes? I'm not in the industry at all (hence why I'm almost never able to share anything :/) so curious about what you've found are helpful ways of framing feedback.
I think any feedback is helpful as long as the reader understands the story. Some people try to give feedback on parts of the story without knowing where it's going, etc, and end up giving suggestions that wouldn't work because the characters end up in a completely different situation, or the story goes in a different direction. There are some things I would like feedback on that I can't mention because it would ruin twists or things that are revealed later in the story. There's a specific scene in the beginning where we're introduced to a character, where every bit of dialogue is super important because of a reveal later in the story, and it's difficult to know if what I wrote does what I wanted it to do. If that makes sense. Haha.
 
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#98
The one note I find myself giving the most frequently is to LEARN FORMAT.

Personally, when I read someone else's script, that's the first thing I take note of. IMO, format is the easiest part of screenwriting; it's the easiest aspect to learn, internalize and make a habit of. So when I open a script and see that it's riddled with format errors (and poor grammar, and misspells, and fancy fonts, etc) the first thing I think is, "If this writer couldn't be bothered to learn something as easy as formatting, I have no reason to believe they learned the actual hard stuff like story and character building." It's all the reason I need not to bother reading further.

New writers complain that format is too restrictive, that it hinders their "flow." That's because they haven't internalized it yet. Once you've learned formatting, have internalized it, once it's become a habit, you automatically write in format without even thinking about it. Thing is, even if the screenwriter is a natural born story teller, and has crafted a great story populated with fascinating characters -- but have not written it in format -- nobody's going to know how great the story is or how fascinating the characters are, because they're not going to read it. By not learning format, the writer has shot him/herself in the foot.

LEARN FORMAT!
 
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#99
Putting my money where my mouth is, here's the first 13 of a haunted house script I'm working on. Not looking for feedback, just showing that I (hopefully) know what I'm talking about. Actually, I may have already posted some of this somewhere, I don't remember. Anyway, here you go, the set-up of my script House of Vile Spirits:
 
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There's really no excuse for someone to not format correctly, with the multitudes of screenwriting software we have today.
 
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