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What script are you reading right now?

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#61
Just read Kajganich's Suspiria, and just as I thought, it's pretty much a ho-hum and forgettable witch story like the original. As I said on here already, there is hope that it will be a visually interesting film, and indeed, there are some intriguing things that happen throughout that could look pretty cool (tiny pieces of which can be seen in the trailer). However, narrative-wise, don't expect a whole lot.

On a sidenote, something I found really odd about this draft was the alarming number of typos throughout: words misspelled, words out of order, wrong tenses used, etc. Either Kajganich was drunk when he wrote this, or the intern who typed it up was, and nobody bothered to go back and proofread it.
Is that script available publicly? Been itching to read it. Big Argento fan here.
 
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#63
Just read Kevin and Dan Hageman's 2017 draft of Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark (Story by Guillermo del Toro). The basic story, which takes place in 1968, follows a group of teenagers in a small town that end up in a supposedly haunted house (naturally...) where a young, deformed girl ("Sarah Bellows") was once kept locked up by her wealthy family. The girl used to write and tell scary stories, which the children loved to come and listen to, but somewhere down the line, she got accused of murdering several of them. Back in the present, the kids find her book of stories, take it with them, and end up getting cursed, with new stories popping up in the book telling the circumstances of how they die (Sarah's rotting corpse eventually gets involved too). And so, the kids have to figure out how to stop the curse before they're all killed off.

First thing that sprang to mind, and kept lingering as I read this, was that it feels like something of a rip-off of The Ring (a curse involving a supposedly evil dead girl that pops up to kill people...). However, even though it didn't feel all that original, it was still an enjoyable read with tense sections that had me reading through it pretty quickly. It also had a number of neat visuals that could be pretty frightening if done well, including a living scarecrow (and someone turning into a scarecrow), a plethora of tiny spiders bursting out of someone's giant zit, and, of course, Sarah Bellows' rotting corpse. I wish they had gone with a different stinger at the end (it's a rip-off of another famous horror flick), and perhaps it did get another rewrite, but at least it's a decent little homage (though a little on-the-nose). Overall, it was a fun read, and I'm quite curious to see how well it turns out (fingers crossed they tossed out the 2014 Dunstan and Melton draft).

Edit: Flipping through the D&M draft, it looks completely different, and the one character that's been announced so far ("Stella Michaels") is from the Hagemans' draft, so luckily it looks like they're going with the latter (backed up further by the vague descriptions I've seen that match the draft I read).
 
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#64
Speaking of the 2019 Oscar race, I jumped ahead and read Greta Gerwig's upcoming adaptation of Little Women. I should note that I've never read Alcott's novel, nor have I seen any film adaptations of the story (though that will change shortly), so this is basically my first exposure to the material. It's an enjoyable story, though it does make for a lot of characters to juggle, so characterization is going to be key for bringing this thing together (honestly, in the first half of this 144-page script, I sometimes had to stop and ask... "Which sister is that again?"). However, after a while, the characters do get decently established, and while it has one of those too-perfect endings (similar to the way everything works out perfectly at the end of Austin's Sense & Sensibility), it should make for a pretty good film under Gerwig's supervision. And that's not to mention the incredible cast that's been lined up for it so far: Saoirse Ronan, Timothee Chalamet, Meryl Streep, Emma Watson, Florence Pugh, and possibly Laura Dern (sounds like they might as well reserve a slot in the Best Cast category for it right now). Overall, definitely looking forward to seeing how it turns out next year.
 
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#65
Zero interest in LITTLE WOMEN. Read JUST MERCY. Now that's pure Oscar Bait. It was great. Michael B. Jordan and Jamie Foxx are locks for the acting categories. Very strong material.
 
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#66
If we are talking 2019 ----I just polished off both Leonard Bernstein Biopics and the Josh Singer/Bradley Cooper version - Maestro - is the better of the two and pretty solid potential Oscar bait. Also the perfect day/night fodder for Guns Akimbo which I had read prior to that. That will not win any awards but may just be one of the most insane things I have ever read. Just totally ******* nuts. The 32 page look book that came with it somehow did it no justice despite being a page by page WTF all by itself. Loving the Daniel Radcliffe career trajectory over the last few years. Good stuff.
 
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#67
If we are talking 2019 ----I just polished off both Leonard Bernstein Biopics and the Josh Singer/Bradley Cooper version - Maestro - is the better of the two and pretty solid potential Oscar bait. Also the perfect day/night fodder for Guns Akimbo which I had read prior to that. That will not win any awards but may just be one of the most insane things I have ever read. Just totally ******* nuts. The 32 page look book that came with it somehow did it no justice despite being a page by page WTF all by itself. Loving the Daniel Radcliffe career trajectory over the last few years. Good stuff.
How was The American? Is it something that could be made without the rights to Bernstein’s scores?
Jake Gyllenhaal and Cary Fukunaga sound like a very interesting paring.
 
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#68
How was The American? Is it something that could be made without the rights to Bernstein’s scores?
Jake Gyllenhaal and Cary Fukunaga sound like a very interesting paring.
Ask me again after the inevitable Fukunaga draft materializes. If it has not already and I am just not paying attention. I feel like this Mitnick draft was all structure and questionable charactization. I get what Mitnick was going for - the problem is it comes off a bit too 90s HBO TV Movie in comparison to the Singer draft. At times even drifting toward odd with a few of the choices made. Yes - rights considerations will also have to be a factor as this was clearly done prior to the Cooper version obtaining all the rights. It will be interesting to see how they work around that. It is not fatal to the existing story - just - uh - challenging. I absolutely do not see what the heck Fukuaga is doing on this. That bizarre attachment is the most interesting thing about this project as is.
 
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#69
Very interesting! Thanks for the thoughts man. This has got me even more intrigued to try and get this script now, which i didn't think was possible haha
 
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#70
Curious how Gerwig’s version of Little Women compares to Sarah Polley’s script (theoretically the same project, both for Pascal I believe).
 
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#73
Coming back to this year, I read Paul Dano and Zoe Kazan's Wildlife. The story revolves around a family: Jerry, Jeanette, and their son Joe, who have recently moved to Montana in 1960. They're barely scraping by, with Jerry teaching golf at a local club, but after he gets fired, he is forced to look for other work, which leads him to join the men fighting a large wildfire nearby. His absence is the catalyst that drives his wife to have an affair during the few days he's gone, which forces Joe into a really awkward position as he waits (and hopes) for his dad to return safely.

This is one of those scripts that starts off pretty well, but as it heads into the second act, it felt like it just started to meander (which is odd given that the script is a brief 102 pages) before coming into a finale that didn't work particularly well. I guess the main problem was that I wasn't really believing Jeanette's actions, particularly when her 14-year-old kid knows full-well what's going on (she brings him over to have dinner at the guy's house for crying out loud!). Subsequently, when it gets to the third act, it feels like it resolves too easily and then ends abruptly. It's not a bad script, and it made for a quick, breezy read, but ultimately the characters needed to be developed a little better.

On a sidenote, the film has already been getting rave reviews, with particular praise going towards Carey Mulligan's performance as Jeanette and Paul Dano's directing, so perhaps it all turned out well in the end. After all, the draft I read was from 2015, and it apparently filmed in 2016-17, so there was definitely time to smooth things out (though everything from the trailer was included).
 
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#74
Speaking of the 2019 Oscar race, I jumped ahead and read Greta Gerwig's upcoming adaptation of Little Women. I should note that I've never read Alcott's novel, nor have I seen any film adaptations of the story (though that will change shortly), so this is basically my first exposure to the material. It's an enjoyable story, though it does make for a lot of characters to juggle, so characterization is going to be key for bringing this thing together (honestly, in the first half of this 144-page script, I sometimes had to stop and ask... "Which sister is that again?"). However, after a while, the characters do get decently established, and while it has one of those too-perfect endings (similar to the way everything works out perfectly at the end of Austin's Sense & Sensibility), it should make for a pretty good film under Gerwig's supervision. And that's not to mention the incredible cast that's been lined up for it so far: Saoirse Ronan, Timothee Chalamet, Meryl Streep, Emma Watson, Florence Pugh, and possibly Laura Dern (sounds like they might as well reserve a slot in the Best Cast category for it right now). Overall, definitely looking forward to seeing how it turns out next year.
Where were you able to find her adaptation?
 
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#75
Currently reading The Graduate. The first act, minus the exposition from the first like 4 pages, is so well introduced. It reads quite funnily too.
 
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#76
Read Taika Waititi's 2017 draft of Jojo Rabbit and really enjoyed it. Taking place in 1944 Germany, the story follows a ten-year-old boy named Jojo who has joined up with a Hitler youth group, dreaming to one day be part of Hitler's personal guard (and it just so happens that his imaginary friend is a goofy version of the Fuhrer). However, after he is accidentally injured by a grenade, he is forced to find other ways to contribute. Meanwhile, he discovers that there is a young Jewish girl named Elsa hiding in his house, whom we know is being taken care of by Jojo's mother, Rosie. At first, Jojo wants to use the opportunity to learn all of the supposedly terrible things about Jews, but eventually he finds their relationship developing into something else.

This is a really bizarre mixture of drama and comedy, and it's that balance of tone that's really going to determine how well this project turns out. At times, it will be concentrating on the seriousness of the war, while in the next moment, it will shift to imaginary Hitler being silly or other lighter scenes Jojo has with Elsa, his mother, or the Nazis (there's a particular pair that are pretty much nothing but comic relief, to be played by Sam Rockwell and Alfie Allen). It's going to be fascinating to see how it ends up on screen, but it certainly helps that it's a really captivating story, and the intriguing tonal shifts only serve to make it more compelling. The film just wrapped recently, so it'll probably still be a while before we see a trailer, but I'm definitely looking forward to checking it out when it finally gets released.
 
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#77
Read Taika Waititi's 2017 draft of Jojo Rabbit and really enjoyed it. Taking place in 1944 Germany, the story follows a ten-year-old boy named Jojo who has joined up with a Hitler youth group, dreaming to one day be part of Hitler's personal guard (and it just so happens that his imaginary friend is a goofy version of the Fuhrer). However, after he is accidentally injured by a grenade, he is forced to find other ways to contribute. Meanwhile, he discovers that there is a young Jewish girl named Elsa hiding in his house, whom we know is being taken care of by Jojo's mother, Rosie. At first, Jojo wants to use the opportunity to learn all of the supposedly terrible things about Jews, but eventually he finds their relationship developing into something else.

This is a really bizarre mixture of drama and comedy, and it's that balance of tone that's really going to determine how well this project turns out. At times, it will be concentrating on the seriousness of the war, while in the next moment, it will shift to imaginary Hitler being silly or other lighter scenes Jojo has with Elsa, his mother, or the Nazis (there's a particular pair that are pretty much nothing but comic relief, to be played by Sam Rockwell and Alfie Allen). It's going to be fascinating to see how it ends up on screen, but it certainly helps that it's a really captivating story, and the intriguing tonal shifts only serve to make it more compelling. The film just wrapped recently, so it'll probably still be a while before we see a trailer, but I'm definitely looking forward to checking it out when it finally gets released.
This was on the blacklist a few years back, do you know of any major differences between that draft and this one?
 
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#78
This was on the blacklist a few years back, do you know of any major differences between that draft and this one?
Scanning through the old 2012 Black List draft, I don't see any major differences. It's only three pages longer than the one I read, and I only see very minor changes in dialogue in a few spots, so it looks like not much changed at all over those five years.
 
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#80
Scanning through the old 2012 Black List draft, I don't see any major differences. It's only three pages longer than the one I read, and I only see very minor changes in dialogue in a few spots, so it looks like not much changed at all over those five years.
I’m not surprised. I’d also expect some dialogue changes from some improv in the final film.
 
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